At a recent press conference attended by Jim Bob and Michelle Duggar, and a majority of their 19 children, Christina Hagan gave a speech to introduce her version of the Heartbeat bill – which would effectively ban all abortions in Ohio.    In the speech, Hagan makes the case that if all women were just forced to follow through with their unwanted pregnancies, we could quickly fill the positions in Ohio that are currently unfilled because they require highly-specialized and experienced employees.

“There’s a lot of folks who say you shouldn’t work on social issues but in fact economic issues and social issues go hand in hand,” said Hagan. “When we have 20,000 of children that are aborted in an annual basis in the state of Ohio and we have 70,000 unfilled jobs, there might be a correlation.”

(As always, Marc Kovac has the video – embedded at the end)

There may well be a correlation, but it’s not the one Hagan claims.

Forcing women to have babies,  women who know they aren’t capable of caring for a child right now for  financial, family, medical or other reasons, is likely to have the exact opposite effect.   As women are forced to leave the workforce or leave school in order to stay at home to care for thousands of new babies each year, the cost of social services will go up, unemployment will go up and the number of unfilled skilled-labor positions will continue to grow.

Meanwhile, State Rep John Becker has introduced a bill that would kick pregnant women and low-income parents off of Medicaid in Ohio.  Because, you know, Republicans love babies.

In other crazy unfilled-job news: Ohio Representative Dave Joyce has a different theory about why we have so many open positions available: everyone is a lazy drug addict.

According to Joyce, businesses have open positions “because they either can’t find people to come to work sober, daily, drug-free and want to learn the necessary skills going forward to be able to do those jobs.”

Of course!  That makes MUCH more sense.

Here’s the Hagan video:

 

 

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