The central argument in the ECOT lawsuit attempting to block the Ohio Department of Education from auditing the charter school’s attendance is the claim that ECOT is not required to track login information for the students, but is simply required to “offer” students opportunities to log in and learn.

The school claims that an old contract with ODE stipulates this requirement for funding purposes.  The school’s contract with their sponsor, however, contains language that states that ECOT’s attendance policy is that students will be engaged in learning for five hours per day and five days per week, meaning that the school is accountable to its sponsor to follow these rules.

An ECOT teacher posted a video online welcoming her new students to the school that, among other things, explains ECOT’s attendance policy:

At 3:54 of the video, the teacher states:

ECOT policy is to work five hours a day, five days a week . . . you just need to remember that you need to work at least 25 hours a week.”

As ECOT’s stated attendance policy (since at least 2009 per the video), then this student engagement should be tracked by the school and used to justify their attendance for funding purposes.

Whether the student work is completed while logged in or tracked by a teacher in terms of duration, ECOT clearly should have such documentation available as evidence of student enrollment and attendance.

 

 
  • anothergoof

    C’mon. Now we’re attacking hard working teachers? This is pretty low. Maybe we should start posting videos from inside urban classrooms. Wonder how many teachers would be comfortable with such intense scrutiny by public media to prove a political point?

  • gregmild

    Please elaborate on how you see this as an attack on this teacher. The video from an ECOT employee was publicly posted and simply used to illustrate that ECOT has had an attendance policy in place that has been openly shared with students that has an expectation of 5 hours per day & 5 days per week. Not one direct comment was made about the teacher other than her statement about the attendance policy.

  • Think.

    Could “anothergoof” be a pseudonym for Jeremy Aker (EcotPals), Bill Lager’s hired hand? This writer has that same style of misrepresenting what was written, making it easier to attack based on a misleading premise. Give it up, Aker!

  • gregmild

    goofproof, anothergoof, duckmonkeyman – whatever – has been commenting on the blog for a while, not just ECOT posts.

  • anothergoof

    No, you are singling out this teacher and using her honest effort to reach students to further your particular political agenda. While her video might have been public (YouTube), perhaps asking her permission would be in order. Why put the teacher in this position?

  • anothergoof

    Yes, I get tired of the same name. It is interesting, when I post a position that the blog disagrees with, the reaction is to attack the messenger? I had the same response from the anti-levy folks in Westerville awhile back when I was trying to support the levy and teachers. They immediately ignored the message and attacked the messenger assuming I was a union member (I have never been).
    My point is if you want to debate the issues, fine. But why use this teacher’s video? Please answer that. You seem to have crossed a line.

  • gregmild

    I don’t think I attacked you with my question back.

    First, getting information out of ECOT is next to impossible as the operations are privatized.
    Second, I felt the full video needed to be posted for aunthenticity purposes and for dating it as being seven years old.
    Third, ECOT officials are making opposite claims about attendance tracking in their lawsuit and this calls those claims into question.

    Overall, I felt the full video (again, from seven years ago) needed to be posted in its entirety for the purposes of authenticity and the direct contradiction to current ECOT administrative claims to the contrary. ECOT officials need to be held accountable for what I believe are outright lies about their entire operation and when information arises that is important in exposing these lies, I believe it needs to be shared with the broader public.

    NOT posting the full, authentic video merely leaves open other critics to question the sharing of information as simple hearsay or made-up “facts” as can be found on many other websites.

  • anothergoof

    Rationalize all you want. Please be aware of the direction you and Plunderbund are taking this. From outside the echo chamber, this article looks like a left-leaning Brietbart. Everyone should listen to feedback and I am giving you some.

    Here is what you did. You found a video from a special ed teacher, posted it, and are trying to establish it as somehow proving your point about a general district wide policy in an ongoing court case. If the teacher does not have due process (do you?) she may be terminated. Either way, she was simply trying to do her job to reach students.

    So far, I haven’t seen a significant move to start using or dividing teachers in the ongoing conflict from either side. You are moving into new territory. I’d prefer we not start scouring the internet or classrooms for content in an effort to play “gotcha”. Or maybe involving classroom teachers just trying to do their job is inevitable? You tell me.

  • gregmild

    I was answering your question. Thank you for the feedback.

  • anothergoof

    Thank you for the responses, too. I was just trying to suggest perhaps this was too far. The media has power. Teachers do not. Let’s just let teachers do their already difficult job without having to look over their shoulders even more often. Thanks again.

  • gregmild

    Side note – I read and appreciate your thoughtful comments on all of the blog’s posts even if I rarely comment back. Thank you for always engaging in thoughtful dialogue.

  • Susan Riley

    This is just crapola of the first order. Eighth grade is from 9:00 AM until 12:30 PM, but only 4 days per week. Doing the math, you get 14 hours a week of class time (minus 10 minute breaks between classes, effecting reducing that even further.
    I never had a problem with the teachers, per se. I felt they did the best they could under this miserable model. The question remains, however, why would good teachers ~want~ to work for ECOT?

  • Susan Riley

    Read what I wrote. I certainly am not attacking the teacher, though I do question why she would want to work at ECOT.
    ECOT sucks monkey, and I feel qualified to say this having put up with their nonsense for the entire 2015-16 school year.

  • Former ECOT Teacher

    I feel specially qualified to answer this question! 🙂 I needed a job where I could continue to live in the area that I already lived in and this was the only teaching job I could find. When I found something better, I left to do that.

    Many teachers joined because of flexibility to be involved in their children’s school events under older, less rigid working hours that are not necessarily in place any longer.

  • Former ECOT Teacher

    While I didn’t feel that this post was an attack in general, I do think that it is very important for people discussing the issues at ECOT to be sure that the problems stay focused very much on the policies made by those running things. In many comment sections on articles surrounding this issue, I’ve read comments from people who misconstrue and misrepresent how ECOT actually works and are dismissive of teachers who do work there. The major problems with ECOT stem directly from its position as a way for the owners to make money, and because of that not doing what would be best for many students, not allowing them to attend once they’ve shown they cannot work independently.

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