So far, we are the only media outlet that has discussed the possible negative political repercussions for the Ohio GOP in 2012 caused by SB 5.  One newspaper columnist I respect greatly, actually suggested that SB 5 will give Shannon Jones a boost to become a potential statewide candidate.   Seriously?

Regardless, we have our first objective data to suggest that going against collective bargaining is hurting the reach of the Republican party.  Admittedly Democratic pollster Public Policy Polling (PPP) recently did a poll in Wisconsin to ask how the people there would have voted if they could “redo the election.”

For the most part, there was little to no change, except in one significant category:

[I]n households where there is a union member, voters now say they’d go for Barrett by a 31 point margin, up quite a bit from the 14 point advantage they report having given him in November.

It’s actually Republicans, more so than Democrats or independents, whose shifting away from Walker would allow Barrett to win a rematch if there was one today. Only 3% of the Republicans we surveyed said they voted for Barrett last fall but now 10% say they would if they could do it over again. That’s an instance of Republican union voters who might have voted for the GOP based on social issues or something else last fall trending back toward Democrats because they’re putting pocketbook concerns back at the forefront and see their party as at odds with them on those because of what’s happened in the last month.

We all know that whatever the GOP passes, it’ll likely be subject to a repeal referendum.  Whether that vote occurs this year or next isn’t going to matter.  This is the kind of legislation that people affected by it don’t forget soon.  

By “nationalizing” what is occurring in Wisconsin and Ohio by having it spread to other States and having the RNC and Speaker Boehner (although he has YET to propose the same thing at a federal level) endorse and promote it, anger over this is across the Republican brand.

Whatever happens with SB 5, the Republican-voting union members are going to remember this for a very long time, and they aren’t likely to vote Republican again.  The damage is done (unless the bill is defeated) and it will be lasting and up and down the ticket for years.

Enjoy passing SB 5 Republicans, it’s probably your certificate back to the minority.

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  • Ramfan4141

    This is my NO to SB5 slogan/rally sign for all Republican candidates to think about…and I know I’m not alone.

    “I’ve NEVER been a registered Democrat but I’ll be damned if I EVER vote for another Republican!”

  • guest

    Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha,Ha, Ha, Ha, HaHa, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha

  • guest

    Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha,Ha, Ha, Ha, HaHa, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha, Ha

  • stanw/us

    If you feel that way, then join your local Democratic Party. They are committed in their fight against this legislation. Our candidates need your passion

  • Fairminded

    I saw Mr. Suddes article in the Cleveland PlainDealer as well. I was very surprised when he indicated Ms.Jones would be elevated as popular future candidate in the state. I disagree with this!

    One of the perceptions that has been pounded by the media for the past year is the magnitude of the Tea Party influence. I did some research after the elections because I refused to believe the majority of Americans support their ultra-conservative agenda. What I found out was quite eye-opening. First I compiled a list of all the freshman senators and representatives. This information I obtained from ABC news election results. I then went to the United States Elections Project which compiles voter turnout data used by polls, etc. http://elections.gmu.edu/Turno…. I first looked at the national voter turnout which was only 41.6%. I then started looking at individual states with multiple representatives elected with Tea Party support as well as those that have been prevalently in the news. I was shocked at what I found.

    Illinois and New York had 5 new representatives all with Tea Party backing except for one in New York. Voter turnout 42.5% Ill and 35.5% New York. Indiana had a turnout rate of 38.2%, Florida 42.6%, Kentucky 44.2%, Ohio 45.8%, Utah 35.4% and Texas the lowest at 27.1%. The statistics I used from this site was the VEP or total ballots counted divided by eligible voting population except for Texas where no VEP statistic was given. For that state I had to use the VAP which is the total votes cast for the highest office divided by the voting age population. Per this website most polls use the VAP although the VEP is considered the more reliable statistic. This is why I used the VEP.

    It is apparent that most people didn’t vote; either because they didn’t like the people on the ballot or felt their votes don’t matter. I think it is a reasonable assumption that people who are highly motivated to vote really are for their candidate! The bottom line is I think this helps illustrate that the majority of Americans do not consider themselves Tea Partiers!

  • The Republican Party is being hurt here in Wisconsin by our imperial governor and his radical behavior. That is the feeling around here. There is now a vigorous and growing grass roots movement to recall Walker – and this effort is no Tea Party, phony astroturf! The longer Emperor Walker continues his slash and burn policies and temper-tantrums – the more damage it does to the Republican Party of Wisconsin!

  • We have some of these Baggers that are attempting to recall some of our 14 senator heroes that left the state…Up in Green Bay, they held a meeting for recall information and a couple hundred showed up…but outside showing support for the absent senator was several hundred protesters.

  • We have some of these Baggers that are attempting to recall some of our 14 senator heroes that left the state…Up in Green Bay, they held a meeting for recall information and a couple hundred showed up…but outside showing support for the absent senator was several hundred protesters.

  • Courtlady

    Shannon Jones a potential statewide candidate? In which state? Not Ohio unless it’s a joke vote. It’s only been 2 months and the only ones who aren’t ready to run her out on a rail already are her ‘good friends’ who she’s using or who want something from her (or both).

  • Anonymous

    Just to be clear, Walker, unlike Kasich, was actually elected with a majority of the vote with a comfortable five-point margin.

  • Anonymous

    Just to be clear, Walker, unlike Kasich, was actually elected with a majority of the vote with a comfortable five-point margin.

  • leeseh

    But how long will it take to undo the damage? The Republicans will gerrymander the state to their advantage (as would the Democrats) . That still means at least 10 years of Republican rule to destroy what is left of this state. And voters have notoriously short memories apparently. I don’t understand why any union household could not see that if one falls, the others are not far behind. It’s only a matter of time.

  • Ghf

    I agree I have never voted democrat in my life (44 years). Republican–never again. Kasich go back to tv…

  • Fairminded

    Dear Modern,
    Per the United States Election Project the voter turnout for Wisconsin was 49.5% so about half of the eligible people that could have voted didn’t. Walker took the election by 51% of the vote versus a little over 46% for the Democratic candidate. This statistic I obtained from the State of Wisconsin. Literally Wisconsin is split in half!

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