Governor Ted Strickland is traveling to Dallas, Texas on Monday to attend the 2010 American Wind Energy Association Annual Conference.? The Governor’s office has told the media that Governor Strickland will be announcing a “groundbreaking announcement regarding offshore wind energy in Ohio” during his panel discussion with Iowa Gov. Chet Culver and Colorado Gov. Bill Ritter, Jr.

Under Governor Strickland’s leadership Ohio has become the leading manufacturer of wind energy components in the nation.? Within the next year, Ohio will have seventy times more commercial wind turbines constructed in the State than when the Governor took office.

A survey last year by the U.S. Department of Energy found that Ohio’s wind energy potential had been grossly underestimated, particularly off the shores of Lake Erie.

In other news, the legislature is poised to reach an agreement ironing out the differences between a House Democratic bill and a Senate Republican bill that ends the tangible property tax that has created a disincentive for alternative energy development in Ohio before the state legislature recesses for the summer.? However, the Cleveland Plain Dealer concedes there are wide differences between the two bills:

The Senate legislation funnels the tax break to projects from renewable energy sources such as wind, solar and geothermal but also extends the state handout to clean coal, advanced nuclear and co-generation projects.

A similar bill still parked in neutral in the House’s Ways and Means Committee is cleaner and greener — it only grants the tangible personal property tax cut to wind and solar energy companies. While majority-party House Democrats are standing firm, saying they only want wind and solar energy to be eligible for the tax break, time is running out to hash out a deal before summer break is due to arrive in mid-June.

You may recall that the Governor called for a repeal of the tangible property tax to benefit wind energy during his State of the State address.

If you’re Green Party gubernatorial candidate Dennis Spisak, all this is nothing more than further evidence of how much Governor Strickland favors dirty coal and nuclear power over cleaner, renewable energy.

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  • “offshore wind energy in Ohio”. that’s funny i don’t care who you are…

  • anastasjoy

    I'm sure Spisak (822 votes statewide) will soon be over at ProgressOhio, throwing a bullshit-filled tantrum. And he could only get 822 voters statewide to buy what he's selling.

  • mvirenicus

    the only thing this proves is that very few people knew they had the option of registering for a third-party ballot and very few people read political blogs.

  • joelsk44039

    Allowing a tax break to wind and solar exclusively, the Ohio Dems create a market distortion that will ultimately come back to bite them on the ass. They just can't seem to understand that every such act causes some kind of unexpected result that isn't always a good thing. Too much interefence in the private sector is the hallmark of socialism.

  • Somewhat agree w/ Joel, but at the end of that day, a tax cut is a tax cut. I love them all.

    So instead of having state government pick winners and losers in the energy sector, why not cut taxes on every business in Ohio? If Modern agrees that cutting taxes on alt-energy will stimulate growth in that industry, surely Modern would agree that cutting taxes on everyone else will stimulate growth in other indusries…

    Modern?

  • Somewhat agree w/ Joel, but at the end of that day, a tax cut is a tax cut. I love them all.

    So instead of having state government pick winners and losers in the energy sector, why not cut taxes on every business in Ohio? If Modern agrees that cutting taxes on alt-energy will stimulate growth in that industry, surely Modern would agree that cutting taxes on everyone else will stimulate growth in other indusries…

    Modern?

  • Nifty Lawrence

    Funny how these same arguments never pop up from the same folks when it's oil, coal & nuclear getting government help via tax breaks, abatements, research & development, environmental cleanups & more they've enjoyed for decades.

    Nope – it's only “socialism” when wind & solar get some relative crumbs.

  • anastasjoy

    The Lib did about five times better than that so clearly we more aware of their option than the Greens ? or else there simply isn't any traction for what Spisak is selling (my belief). There is no “assuming” about minor party candidate being on the ballot in November. They're on. Now it's up to them to sell something people want to buy. And what vote exactly would be a true sign of “voter discontent,” since that can mean so many different things? (The largest number are “discontent” that a Kenyan native is president.) It's virtually impossible to say what a “protest” vote might be, And Spisak is still a clown

  • mvirenicus

    i repeat. very few people knew of their option to vote “minor party” in the primaries. of those very few i'm sure some decided to take major party ballots to vote for specific candidates. until the moment i stepped into my polling place i was tempted to do exactly that just to vote for brunner against fisher. it will be different in november when the various names and parties are staring people in the face, although i agree it's difficult to sell the average ohio voter anything other than bullshit.

  • joelsk44039

    Crumbs? Do you even have an idea of what you're talking about? Coal (other than so-called “Clean Coal,” isn't even covered in the RPS. However, Biomass, Hydro and Geothermal are part of the definition of “renewable.” Why should only wind and solar be included in this tax break bill? Why not the other forms of renewables?

  • Jerry Graf

    The Great Lakes Wind Energy Pilot Project plan to place wind turbines offshore in Lake Erie near Cleveland is another example of an economically non-viable wind turbine project. This projected 20 MW system will really generate 6 MW on an average basis, translating to 42.2 GWh/year, or a revenue return of $2.1 million per year. Operation and maintenance costs are projected to be just under $4.6 million per year, meaning that the $92 million investment will be completely lost, and losses will compound every year the wind turbines are in operation. It is notable and disconcerting that a large portion of the Great Lakes Wind Energy Feasibility Report is devoted to proposals to make the project appear viable with public spending to cover the investment losses and inflated electric rates for ?renewable energy? to pay the operating costs and attract investors. Other similar cases, big and small, can be found for land based wind turbine projects throughout Ohio, Pennsylvania, and other locations; and all are equally wasteful and ineffective.

    Other than the waste itself, the real problem with expending resources subsidizing non-viable wind turbine projects is that this diverts resources from other efforts to improve our energy production strategy. Because of recent events, we are seeing quite a few emotional comments lately regarding the need to reduce US dependence on oil; and the recent tragic spill in the Gulf of Mexico is being used to justify investment in wind energy projects. However, it is reasonable to point out that, per to the DOE EIA, oil is used to generate less than 1% of the total electricity used in the USA so one can effectively say that oil has nothing to do with the generation of electricity. Unfortunately, BY INCREASING THE COST OF ELECTRICITY, IT IS LIKELY THAT WE WILL MAKE IT MORE DIFFICULT TO TRANSITION AWAY FROM OIL for the main reasons we do use oil, home heating and gasoline powered automobiles. Also, in the rush to promote wind generation, development and improvement of other more viable means of energy generation are being ignored. Instead of diverting resources to prop up wind projects we could be improving natural gas, nuclear, and coal generation. We could also be improving the distribution system (grid) to reduce losses and improve reliability. Further, by subsidizing and offsetting the current deficiencies of wind generation, we take away the incentive to make the necessary improvements that might make it viable in some cases in the future.

  • cellisis

    the incentives or tax breaks should be for the renewable energy only in order to promote more green energy in Ohio. if the state government doesn't treat green energy sector more favourably then it would mean the state government is not serious about promoting green energy.

  • Pingback: Kasich’s war on renewable energy, Pt. II: When Clueless Conservatives Attack()

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