The State of Ohio is expecting that the Obama Administration will announce that it will receive $400 million of the $564 million it requested in ARRA federal stimulus funds to implement the 3C rail project.

Officials have said that this is sufficient funding to start passenger rail service among Cincinnati, Dayton, Columbus, and Cleveland by 2012.

Eventually, once there is a reliable source of dependable passenger rail service in Ohio, the 3C rail project is expected to be a precursor to a high-speed rail service.

There are unsubstantiated reports that a company will open a plant in the Columbus area to manufacture passenger rail cars needed for this project.

With nearly 25% of Ohio’s urban residents owning no vehicle of their own, passenger rail service will provide affordable statewide transportation.? It’ll also be a boon to intrastate tourism.

Here’s some of the economic benefits from the 3C Plan:

  • Generates additional $111 million in potential consumer spending
  • Potential to add at least $1.2 billion to Ohio’s economy
  • Generates more than 11,000 potential jobs
  • Creates at least 255 construction jobs over a two year period
  • $1 in passenger rail development can generate $3 in economic benefit
  • Creates opportunities to revitalize vibrant urban cores
  • Attracts and retains young professionals

Here’s the list of government officials and public interest groups that have already endorsed the 3C plan.

And be sure to read about the details of the proposed stations in Dayton and Cleveland as examples of what this project means for Ohio’s major cities.

This is great news for Ohio.

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  • Finally, I can get from Cleveland to Cincinnati in only 6.5 hours.

  • mvirenicus

    If it were left to your ilk that trip would still be traversable only by horse-drawn carriage affordable exclusively to the wealthiest five percent.

  • modernesquire

    Without driving, paying for gas, or parking. When Ohio's able to upgrade to a high speed passenger rail service, the trip will be as fast as car travel.

    Also, given that 25% of urban residents have NO automobile, this is a good step. It's going to drive up the demand for steel, create 11,000 jobs, and it pisses you off royally.

    A perfect sweep.

  • modernesquire

    Frankly, I thought Naugle would prefer human powered carriages like the royals in Ancient Roman used.

  • Ohio won't get the high speed.

    Driving to the train station, parking, waiting for the train which might be late, taking a family of 4 from Cincy to Cleveland for $240 bucks to see a game at Progressive Field, and renting a car. WOW

    Greyhound is 4.5 hours for the same trip, and $11 cheaper per ticket.

    If that steel wasn't in demand already, then you are using government to encourage a malinvestment of resources. But at least you are an honest centralized planner.

  • Shalom Y'all,

    As much as I love mass transit in general and trains specifically, I just don't see who the potential riders are for the project.

    How many Ohioans drive between these cities (and I mean specifically downtown-to-downtown) per day?

    You can't compare this ridership to car traffic on I-71 because the vast majority of the people on I-71 aren't going from downtown-to-downtown but rather driving from suburb to suburb and points in between, all stops that rail will not service.

    When I used to do a lot of business travel I would drive short hops — Cleveland-Pittsburg/Cleveland-Detroit/Cleveland-Cincinnati — because total time was shorter than flying due to the inconvenience of departure times, wait times, parking time and time from home to the airport and back.

    Intrastate rail may be a beginning, but it's Interstate rail that will compete with car/bus and air travel.

    B'shalom,

    Jeff

  • modernesquire

    Non sequiter much? Nothing you just wrote had anything to do with your thesis.
    Please, tell me again how creating 11,000 jobs while improving our infrastructure (a public good which benefits the overall economy) is such a horrible idea. I think the people of Ohio looking to benefit from the nearly 300 construction projects this will generate in the next two years would disagree.

    Also, you wouldn't need to rent a car to see a game in Cleveland. You really don't know squat about public transportation in Ohio, do you?

  • Shalom Brian,

    God will strike me dead for agreeing with Naugle, but the very first thought that came to mind on this was Soviet/Egyptian project of transforming the Nile River with the Aswan Dam. Great short term employment and economic stimulus but not much else, and I'm about as Green as they come.

    Better that $400 million go to the critical need for restoring local mass transit in Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati.

    B'shalom,

    Jeff

  • cubejockey

    true…but I wouldn't put my family on a grayhound.

  • cubejockey

    All I can say is…i need to get an LLC going and get in on this. What business could i start off it?

  • Shalom Cubejockey,

    Why not?

    B'shalom,

    Jeff

  • cubejockey

    joking im joking

  • mvirenicus

    Because they're an egregious union-busting outfit where crazed riders kill and dismember other passengers while everybody else watches. Aside from that my personal experience is that long-haul buses are an horribly uncomfortable way to travel. Given no hurry, my fave way to travel is Amtrak.

  • mvirenicus

    I'd use it for travel to columbus. Can't think of a single reason I'd visit cincy. πŸ˜›

  • Shalom Mvirenicus,

    But I have such fond memories of humpin' the dog across America. πŸ™‚

    B'shalom,

    Jeff

  • modernesquire

    Not even if I bought you some local microbrews?

  • mvirenicus

    Deal! I'm not much of a beer guy but I'll go a few steps out of my way for a delicious bock. πŸ˜‰

  • mvirenicus

    Ugly imagery, Jeff. πŸ™‚ I rode the bus often in my youth when I wasn't hitchhiking. I sometimes miss the hitchhiking, but never the hound. Heh

  • Anonymous

    Just. Can’t. Imagine. It. Can you?

    Try thinking outside your worldview for a moment. You might not agree, but at least you’ll have a better argument than “That’s just nonsense!”. Have you no scholarly curiosity? Dare to imagine.

    Amazon.com editorial review of Prof. Walter Block’s “Privatization of Roads and Highways”.

    “Walter Block’s remarkable new treatise on private roads, will cause you to rethink the whole of the way modern transportation networks operate. It is bold, innovative, radical, compelling, and shows how free-market economic theory is the clarifying lens through which to see the failures of the state & see the alternative that is consistent with human liberty.

    He shows that even the worst, off-the-cuff scenario of life under private ownership of roads would be fantastic by comparison to the existing reality of government-ownership.

    That is only the beginning of what Block has done. He has made a lengthy, detailed, and positive case that the privatization of roads would be socially optimal in every way. It would save lives, curtail pollution, save us (as individuals!) money, save us massive time, introduce accountability, & make transportation a pleasure instead of a pain in the neck.

    Because this is the first-ever complete book on this topic, the length & detail are necessary. He shows that this is not some libertarian pipe-dream but the most practical application of free-market logic. Block is dealing with something that confronts us everyday. And in so doing, he illustrates the power of economic theory to take an existing set of facts and help you see them in a completely different way.

    What’s also nice is that the prose has great passion about it, despite the great scholarly detail. He loves answering the objections (aren’t roads public goods? Aren’t roads too expensive to build privately?) and making the case, fully aware that he has to overcome a deep and persistent bias in favor of public ownership. The writer burns with a moral passion on the subjects of highway deaths and pollution issues. His “Open Letter to Mothers Against Drunk Driving” is a thrill to read!

    The book comes together as a battle plan against government roads and a complete roadmap for a future of private transportation. “

    http://www.amazon.com/Privatization-Roads-Highways-Walter-Block/dp/193355004X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264731463&sr=8-1

    I’ve read excerpts, but not the whole book (yet). The man delivers.

    (And libertarians, at least not the “I’m-Libertarian-Because-My-Party-Is-Out-Of-Power” variety (see: Glenn Beck), do not accept road building as a “legitimate government function”.)

  • tudorman

    It's a horrible idea because it takes money from people aren't even born yet and will have no interest in paying for some central planner's stupid idea and gives it to people who likely think the idea is pretty stupid too, only they're more than happy to let the central planner rob everybody else and their own children on their behalf.

    It's a horrible idea because the government, which is beyond broke, ought not borrow money to build new shit that's not needed when the shit they've already built is falling apart.

  • modernesquire

    Ohio's budget to repair infrastructure is up over 30% from the prior budget. Strickland just announced a host of infrastructure repair projects today, too.

    You'd prolly have opposed Eisenhower's Interstate System, too.

  • Adrienne

    Hey,
    I don't know why the math is so hard. We pay taxes to buy/pay for things that we can't afford ourselves and private sector cannot make a profit on….how about the roads, traffic signals, police, fire, libraries, etc.

    FOR EXAMPLE: Someone's tax dollars paid for the roads to be built before I was born. I am happy that they had the foresight for the interstate highway system, and paid for it so that I/we can drive from Cleveland to Chicago or wherever relatively stress free. It's called socialism folks…….

    The same with schools K-12 and colleges, hospitals….well you get the point.

    Let's face it when gasoline is $10/gallon, I will be more than happy to take a train then fill up my gas tank sending money to people who hate us and use our money against us.

  • tudorman

    Yes, I would have.

    But you prolly lack faith in the ability of people to creatively and voluntarily solve the problem of roads, or any other large infrastructure project, without “assistance” from the state. You prolly think the beautiful city neighborhoods (like where my parents grew up) that were destroyed by the interstates as acceptable collateral damage in the name of the “public good”. You prolly were never told that you had to sell something, oh, like your house, that was bought and paid for, even though you didn't want to sell it and move, at any price. But you prolly think you are head and shoulders smarter than any of those wretched slobs who lived in those houses and didn't know what was good for them anyway.

    And like I said, the government is beyond broke. You better hope the Chinese, Japanese, and everybody else will lend you the money to pay for your new train set.

  • modernesquire

    Democratic representative government is the process in which we creatively and voluntarily solve the problem of roads. I'm sorry that you're family has obvious been the victim of the State's eminent domain powers, but roads don't get paved without government. Never has, nor will.

  • tudorman

    Democratic representative government is the process in which 50% +1 of the people get to impose their will upon the other 50%-1. That's great, as long as your side has the “+1”, right? Tough shit if your -1.

    And if the government wasn't building the roads, somebody else would. And they'd have to do it without using the government to exploit the taxpayers.

  • modernesquire

    That's just nonsense. The idea that roads would be built without government. It's never happened. Period. Government build roads…. even libertarians accept that premise as a legitimate government function.

  • akronboy

    they are going to use existing rails, this will add zero jobs

    a complete waste.

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  • Shalom Mvirenicus,

    I hitchhiked going east, rode the bus going back west. There was one night in the backseat of the dog near Salina, Kansas…

    B'shalom,

    Jeff

  • Shalom Brian,

    Uh, I hate to come in on the side of the devils, but history is rife with roads and other public works projects such as bridges, dams and harbors being built by subscription.

    The process was the origin of the toll road. The greatest example in the United States, of course, is, in fact, the rail system which is 99.9 percent privately built. (Railroads did receive very lucrative land grants as in incentive to build.)

    B'shalom,

    Jeff

    B'shalom,

    Jeff

  • mvirenicus

    I have no memories of riding the bus except discomfort and insomnia. On the other hand I met so many great ppl while hitchhiking. I could tell endless stories involving good company, free meals, stays in people's guest rooms and handguns. Hehe. I'll never forget the indiana state trooper who gave me a ride to a truck stop, bought me breakfast and told them to let me sleep in the driver lounge. I hope he's still around and doing well.

  • Shalom Brian,

    In hindsight, Eisenhower's Interstate Defense Highway System has proven to be not such a good idea. Originally conceived as a way to facilitate the rapid evacuation of cities in times of a threat of nuclear war, they have instead:

    Facilitated white flight from cities;
    Engendered urban sprawl;
    Drastically increased our dependence on foreign oil;
    Ballooned our nation's carbon footprint; and
    Crippled our previous rail system by diverting traffic to diesel trucks.

    There's more, but holding up the Interstates as a good example of government spending is not so good.

    B'shalom,

    Jeff

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  • Mary Jo

    So, let's get this straight. Virenicus, your best memories of hitching are a free breakfast and sleeping in the driver's lounge. Hess, your best memory of the bus involves a backseat and something that you seem to yadda yadda right over. Come on Virenicus, you gotta give us something better.

  • mvirenicus

    Okay mary jo, here's a hitching story from right here in ohio. An old man picked me up and almost immediately pulled a revolver from under his seat. He said, “this is just in case you get any ideas.” He drove me over 100 miles and we had great conversation along the way. Oh yeah, he bought me lunch too.

  • Mary Jo

    Well Mvirenicus, I hope you cleaned your plate at lunch or he might have had to shoot you. These things happen. I could tell you about hitchin' around Ireland but I'd have to yadda yadda a bit of it myself. By the way, where did you get the name Mvirenicus? Are you a Roman centurion?

  • ryan

    It is okay.

    ohio is thinking ahead of the curve.

    most commercial air travel will go under when Oil remains above 90 bucks a barrel most of the time. China and japan have much more to trade for oil than the U.S.

    Big Government built our interstates. Mandated them. It was a wealth generating program: it made it possible for many folks to become rich as developers or big box retailers or shopping mall developers and office park magnates. the steel makers and industrialists who built all the cars we needed to get to the mall and the office park and school.

    Now Big Government has to rebuild most of the rail that America dismantled in the mid 20th century.

    world's gonna slow down a bit as oil gets harder to pay for.

  • mvirenicus

    i've spent most of my life fastidiously avoiding the yadda yadda moments and with few exceptions leaving a trail of disappointment in my wake. yadda yadda. icky. no “good” hitchin stories. sorry. hehe the name is something i've been using for so long for practically everything on the internet i've nearly forgotten what it means and nobody else would be interested.

  • Mary Jo

    Hi, mvirenicus, well you definitely made wise lifestyle decisions, no doubt about that. As for your name, does it have something to do with a mosquito?

  • mvirenicus

    LOL stop it! i'm working on a “professional” static web site over here and i can't tolerate humor when engaged in something about which i'm clueless. and replace “wise” with “egotistical” for more accuracy regarding the yadda yadda crap.

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