via email from PFAW:

Although Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland (D) has said he wants to eliminate the state?s troubled private-school voucher program, the Republican-controlled state House yesterday passed a budget maintaining the program, and the state Senate is apparently poised to do the same. The Columbus Dispatch reports on one parochial school that fails to meet the lowered requirements for private schools to receive state money: Harvest Preparatory Academy, operated by televangelist Rod Parsley?s World Harvest megachurch.

They quote a Dispatch article, which has this gem from a school spokesperson:

“(The school) has the utmost confidence in both the qualifications and the Christian character of its teaching staff,” Corder said. “It would be misleading to suggest that there is a problem to rectify.”

Let’s see. 28 of 36 teachers are not licensed. One doesn’t have a college degree and is teaching English and Science. Yes. Nothing to see here. Please move on…

Tagged with:
 
  • While I don’t think that all teachers have to be certified to be well qualified…I also believe that the state and tax dollars should not pay for religiously oriented schooling. If I decide to send my kids to a Christian school, it will be because I’m paying for them to go there, and not because I get a good deal.

  • bryan

    the dispatch article was LAZY. in fact, private school teachers are required to get a non-tax certificate, not the public school teaching license. so, they are licensed by the state in a different way. but that fact is buried at the bottom of the article.

  • #!: Agree mostly, however I think if you are well qualified you should prove it through certification. Kids deserve that.

    #2: I wondered about that. WTH is a “non-tax” certificate? Is it the same? Is it less stringent, and if so, why?

  • I’m not sure what the difference is between the normal public certification and the “non-tax” certificate (is it “non-tax” because the school they work at is supposed to not be funded with tax dollars? If so, it seems reasonable that if a voucher program is in place 100% of the teachers should be expected to get the standard state certification). However, I do know that certification is not a one-time process – my mother is a teacher, and she has to continually educate herself to re-certify. I think she could get her PhD if she bothered to write a dissertation, she’s got so many graduate course hours.

Looking for something?

Use the form below to search the site:


Still not finding what you're looking for? Drop a comment on a post or contact us so we can take care of it!